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Center for Regional Economic and Business Networks

Researchers

Yukiko Abe, Researcher (Professor, Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University)

Profile
Yukiko Abe graduated from the University of Tokyo’s Faculty of Economics in 1987 and obtained a Ph.D. in Economics from the Graduate School at Princeton University in 1994. After stints with the Faculties of Economics at Nagoya City University and Asia University, she took up a position as an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University in 2005. She assumed her present post in 2009.
Publications
Family Labor Supply, Commuting Time, and Residential Decisions: The Case of the Tokyo Metropolitan Area, Journal of Housing Economics 20, pp. 49–63, 2011; The Equal Employment Opportunity Law and Labor Force Behavior of Women in Japan, Journal of the Japanese and International Economies 25, pp. 39–55, 2011; Regional Variations in Labor Force Behavior of Women in Japan, Japan and the World Economy, forthcoming, 2013.

I have recently engaged in an international comparative study on regional differences in women’s participation in the workforce.

Han Jaehyang, Researcher (Professor, Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University)

Profile
In 1999, I graduated from Kyoto University Faculty of Economics. After completing my coursework toward a Ph.D. in Economics at The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Economics in 2004, I received the degree in 2007. I served as a specially appointed Associate Professor at Tokyo University Graduate School of Economics before assuming my current position in 2012.
Publications
“An Economic History of Zainichi Korean Enterprises,” The University of Nagoya Press, 2010. “The Automobile Industry,” in Takeda, H. (ed.) Japan’s Economy in the High Growth Period — The Conditions for Realizing High Economic Growth, Yuhikaku,2011. “Korean ethnic group in Japan,” in Higuchi, N. (ed.) Ethnic Businesses in Japan, Sekaishisosha, 2012.

My research considers the framework relating to the economic activities of ethnic groups in Japan from the perspective of the histories and characteristics of typical industries and corporate activities.

Tsutomu Hashimoto, Researcher (Professor, Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University)

Profile
Tsutomu Hashimoto graduated from Yokohama National University’s College of Economics in 1990. He completed a Doctoral Program at the University of Tokyo’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 1996 before going on to earn a Ph.D. He became a Lecturer at Hokkaido University’s Faculty of Economics in 1996 and assumed his present post in 2011 after serving as a Visiting Scholar at New York University.
Publications
How to Live with Freedom (in Japanese), Chikumashobo Ltd., November 2007; Dispute over Max Weber in Japan (in Japanese), author and editor, Nakanishiya Shuppan, Jul. 2008; Sociology of Freedom (in Japanese), NTT Publishing Co., Ltd., Dec. 2010.
Hokkaido’s population is expected to decrease by around 40 percent before 2050. What can we do to brace ourselves for the arrival of a society marked by such decline? A dwindling population does not reduce costs associated with electricity/water, infrastructure (e.g., roads and schools), and the like; indeed, the need to maintain conventional social capital will result in even higher cost structures. Against such a background, what can be done to bear or mitigate these costs? It may be necessary to consider policy measures such as converting residential areas back into forestland, focusing on the creation of compact cities and boldly promoting natural energy usage. I believe REBN serves as a forum for people to discuss and envision the contribution local communities can make in this regard with a long-term perspective.

Kenta Hiramoto, Researcher (Professor, Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University)

Profile
Kenta Hiramoto graduated from Hokkaido University’s Faculty of Economics in 1987 and partially completed a Doctoral Course in the Division of Business Administration at the Graduate School of Economics, Hokkaido University in 1991. After serving as an Associate Professor at Shiga University’s Faculty of Economics, he took up a position as an Associate Professor at Hokkaido University’s Faculty of Economics in 1997 and assumed his present post in 2008. He holds a Doctor of Business Administration Degree.
Publications
Information Systems and Competitive Advantages (in Japanese), Hakuto-Shobo Publishing Company, 2007; The Essence of Strategic Collaboration: Value Creation by NPOs, Government and Businesses (in Japanese), author and editor, Yuhikaku Publishing Co., Ltd., 2011.

In today’s world of globalization and standardization, regions have an increasingly significant role to play in the formation of multifaceted social values. One of REBN’s tasks is to address various regional problems and challenges directly from local and regional perspectives. I hope to explore, both in theory and in practice, measures that help regions and their residents to develop vibrant economies and societies.

Yuji Sakagawa, Researcher (Professor, Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University)

Profile
In 1994, I graduated from Otaru University of Commerce — Department of Commerce. In 1998, I completed doctoral coursework at Kobe University Graduate School of Business Administration but did not receive a degree. Also in 1998, I served as a Department of Commerce Lecturer at Otaru University of Commerce, and in 2004, I was an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Economic and Business Administration, Hokkaido University. He assumed his present post in 2013. Ph.D in Economics.
Publications
“Supply Chain Optimization Behavior and the Dynamic State of the Retail Business Format–Application of the Deferred Speculation Model to the Business Format Lifecycle,” Shobaigyo Kakushin (Retail Innovation), Chikura Pub., Jan. 2010.

I am conducting research on themes related to marketing and distribution problems in the Japanese market. In my local economy research, I have recently focused on marketing problems within the tourism industry, which is important in terms of policy, as well as in the development of the “sixth industry,” (i.e., local farming and processing that produces food of a higher value), which is impacting the Hokkaido economy. As such, I aim to undertake research that will contribute to the local economy.

Shingo Takagi, Researcher (Professor, Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University)

Profile
Shingo Takagi graduated from Waseda University’s School of Political Science and Economics in 1995 and completed a Doctoral Program at Osaka University’s Graduate School of Economics in 2000. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics. After serving as an Associate Professor at Osaka Prefecture University, he took up a position as an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University in 2000. He has served as an Associate Professor at the Public Policy Course in the Department of Public Policy of the university’s Faculty of Public Policy since 2011. He assumed his present post in 2016.
Publications
Effects of Learning Mathematics on Grades in Economics: A Control Function Approach for Estimation and Pretesting (in Japanese), co-author, submitted; Effects of Competition with Endogenous Entry on the Retail Power Market: an Auction Data Analysis (in Japanese), co-author, Nihon Keizai Kenkyu (JCER Economic Journal), 2009.

I have studied data analysis methods and applications with recent focus on statistical analysis using bid/auction data. The roles expected of bidding systems are large amid today’s rising tides of marketization, the easing of market entry regulations, and other developments in a variety of fields. Accordingly, they have significant impacts on local economies based on the partial opening of public services to the private sector, public works projects and more. Through my research, I strive to analyze real data with an eye on the extent to which these current structures produce the expected effects and how they can be improved.

Mikine Yamazaki, Researcher (Dean, Public Policy School, Hokkaido University)

Profile
Mikine Yamazaki graduated from Hokkaido University’s Faculty of Law in 1990 and partially completed a Doctoral Program at the university’s Graduate School of Law in 1995 with full credits. He received a Ph.D. in law in 1998. After serving as a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Research Fellow (PD), he took up a position in the Department of Economics at the Kushiro Public University of Economics in 1997. He became an Associate Professor at Hokkaido University’s Graduate School of Law in 2001 and assumed his current post in 2007. He served as a Visiting Fellow in the Department of Politics and International Relations of the University of Aberdeen in the UK (Scotland) from 2002 to 2004.
Publications
Devolution and Integration over Territories: With Special Reference to Scotland (in Japanese), Iwanami Shoten Publishers, 2011; Challenges and Achievements of Scotland: A Decade of Citizens and the Parliament that Changed the Region (in Japanese), co-authored/co-edited with the Association of Journalists for Decentralization and Local Self-government, Imagine Publishing Co., Ltd., 2010; History of the Postwar Development of Hokkaido: Looking Back on Development Policy through Dialogue and Chronological Table (in Japanese), co-authored/co-edited with Shuji Koiso, Hokkaido Development Association, 2007; Era of National Land Development: Self-Government and Rule of Postwar Hokkaido (in Japanese), University of Tokyo Press, 2006.

I have researched the territory-oriented national land development policies of Hokkaido, Okinawa, and other regions in postwar Japan as well as relations between national and regional governments. In recent years I have studied trends of devolution in the UK with particular focus on the Scottish Parliament/Government and have also researched trends of the local self-government system (and reform) in contemporary Japan and of reform toward the introduction of a doshu-sei regional government system from the viewpoint of comparative study.

Hiroshi Yoshimi, Researcher (Professor, Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University)

Profile
Hiroshi Yoshimi graduated from Kyushu University’s Faculty of Economics in 1985 and partially completed a Doctoral Program at the university’s Graduate School of Economics with full credits. He took up a position as a Lecturer at Hokkaido University’s Faculty of Economics in 1991 and assumed his present post in 2004. He holds a Doctor of Business Administration Degree.
Publications
Auditing Theory and Cases (in Japanese), Shinsei-Sha Co., Ltd., 2003; Corporate Irregularities and Audits (in Japanese), Zeimu Keiri Kyokai Co., Ltd., 1999.

The focus of my research is on public sector accounting and auditing theories. The former covers a wide range of accounting activities, including national/local governments and non-profit organizations. In recent years, the utilization and improvement of public sector accounting and auditing systems (particularly in financially weak local governments) have become important issues. With an increase in the number of regional public organizations such as independent administrative agencies, there is an increasing need for studies on public sector accounting and auditing, which make up a large portion of such work in local regions.

Tomokazu Abe, Researcher (Associate Professor, Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University)

Profile
In 2001, I graduated from Hitotsubashi University Faculty of Social Sciences. In 2007, I completed doctoral coursework toward a Ph.D. at Hitotsubashi University Graduate School of Commerce and Management. In Feb. 2008 I received a Ph.D. In Apr. 2007, I served as a Lecturer at Nagasaki University Faculty of Economics, and became an Associate Professor in Oct. 2008. Since Apr. 2011, I have served as an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University.
Publications
“A Review Article: Workplace Design and Knowledge Creation,” The Annals of Research Center for Economic and Business Networks, 3, Hokkaido University, 2014.

I have been studying; both empirically and theoretically, workspace design and intra-organizational communication. Recently I have been involved in joint research on co-working .

Masato Hiwatari, Researcher (Associate Professor, Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University)

Profile
Masato Hiwatari graduated from the Department of Social and International Relations at The University of Tokyo’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences in 2001. He completed a Doctoral Program in the Department of Advanced Social and International Studies of the university’s Graduate School of Arts and Science in 2006; he received a Ph.D. He subsequently served as a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Research Fellow (PD); he has been an Associate Professor at the Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University since 2009.
Publications
The Customary Economy and Economic Development: the Community-Based Structure of a Mahalla in Uzbekistan (in Japanese), University of Tokyo Press, 2008.

I have studied the functions and structures of the customary economy, communities, social networks, and the like in developing and transitional countries and other regions where markets are not yet fully developed. My work has also included field surveying in Uzbekistan. Currently, I am interested in quantitative analysis methods using network data.